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Why Non-Gluten Sensitivity Might Be a Bigger Problem Than Celiac Disease Today

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There is growing evidence for non-celiac gluten sensitivity that causes symptoms in people who do not have celiac disease and aren’t allergic to wheat. The truth is researchers are still working to discover the exact cause of NCGS.

It is also estimated that at least 10% of the U.S. population may be suffering from this condition, and when you compare it to the 1% of celiac disease, the numbers of NCGS are staggering.

Before we continue let’s recap some of the common symptoms that if experienced may be a sign that you have NCGS:

1. Mental fatigue (known as “brain fog”)

2. Digestive issues (gas, bloating, diarrhea and even constipation).

3. Fatigue.

4. Diagnosis of an autoimmune disease (Lupus, Psoriasis or Scleroderma).

5. Headaches.

6. Inflammation or pain in your joints.

7. Anxiety, depression and ADD.

8. Skin conditions (eczema or psoriasis)

Another complication is that  there is no full laboratory test for NCGS, actually there is only one lab test, Array 3, more on this in a minute. Therefore your doctor, after believing in your word that you actually feel those symptoms, will have to establish a connection between your symptoms and your consumption of gluten to diagnose you with NCGS. They may ask you to go on a gluten-free diet, and then go back to gluten to see if the symptoms come back, therefore determining it is gluten that is causing your problems. After this cause is established, and your tests come back normal for wheat allergy and celiac disease, your doctor may advise you to begin a gluten-free diet as the treatment.

As the diagnosis of NCGS is very difficult and there is a lot of research that is needed to get to know the disease, millions of people are going to be underdiagnosed, leaving them untreated. They will suffer from those symptoms, are going to be treated without attacking the real cause and continue to damage their own health, due to not following a gluten-free diet

Now according to Tanya Burlakova, the only lab test, Array 3 from Cyrex Laboratories, makes some “people react to several other components of wheat (alpha gliadin, positive for celiac disease). These include many other components epitopes of gliadin (beta, gamma, omega), glutenin, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), gluteomorphin, and deamidated gliadin. What’s more, people can react to other types of tissue transglutaminase, including type 3—primarily found in the skin—and type 6—primarily found in the brain. Learn more about this test here.

So, imagine a scenario where the patient is reacting to deamidated gliadin, glutenin, gluteomorphin, and either transglutaminase-3 or -6, but not reacting to alpha gliadin or transglutaminase-2—which are the antibodies used to screen for CD by most doctors. They will remain undiagnosed, and may continue to eat gluten for the rest of their lives, putting themselves at serious risk for autoimmune and other diseases.”

There is also a lot of people who think this disease doesn’t exist, which makes matters worst for all the people who have NCGS and aren’t going to be diagnosed.

That is why we think it is important to raise awareness and spread the word on this matter, to help the millions of people who are suffering from the consumption of the omnipresent gluten. Be an active participant in the community and help family and friends who might be suffering right now.

 

Original sources:

http://myilifestyle.com/10-shocking-reasons-gluten-intolerance-may-be-more-serious-than-you-think-and-its-making-you-sick/

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/celiac-disease/features/gluten-intolerance-against-grain

http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/gluten-allergy-symptoms

http://daysinhealth.info/3-reasons-gluten-intolerance-may-be-more-serious-than-celiac-disease/

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